Research

Explore our library of research products including academic publications, reports on research and outcomes, policy briefs, videos of webinars, animations, and more. Research products are organized by initiative and/or by type, with the most recent items at the top of the list. Search by topic with the search bar at the top of the page.
 
  • October 2023
    Jail screening practices and services in response to the opioid risk
    Our data integration project allowed us to expand our view of who is booked into jail to include more measures of OUD risk, such as prior nonfatal overdose and prior OUD treatment. By doing so, we were able to examine whether our efforts at identifying this high risk subgroup through screening at booking were effective. Understanding that fatalities attributed to overdose among the recently released population is much higher than community samples, finding methods of identification at critical junctures such as jail intake, is essential to combating mortality rates within the state and one of our continued aims at the CBHJ.
    Treatment ecosystems
    Policy brief
  • October 2023
    The imperative of comprehensive care for EMS-administered naloxone-reversed overdose survivors
    Jail records were record-linked EMS records, Medicaid/TEDS billing records, and Michigan State Police records to create a rare window into the status of care for and risk identification for EMS-attended overdose survivors booked into jail. This brief looks at measures of opioid use disorder risk identification prior to and at jail booking as well as at OUD treatment provided prior to jail, in the jail, and following release. An overdose reversal may be viewed as a flag in a much larger narrative, one that underscores the imperative of providing comprehensive care and support, preemptively and reactively, to those at greatest risk.
    Treatment ecosystems
    Policy brief
  • October 2023
    Assessing the reentry needs of incarcerated individuals with co-occurring opioid use and mental health concerns
    This sample included 490 adults from a targeted jail/prison reentry program for individuals experiencing COD in a Midwestern state. Program participants had histories of trauma, homelessness, and inpatient psychiatric care. Most participants reported needing medical attention for a physical problem. Participants had extensive criminal-legal system exposures. The findings have important implications for expanding reentry services to support individuals with COD, including the need to begin services prior to release and ensure the coordination and continuity of care with community-based treatment providers.
    Reentry
    Publication
  • August 2023
    Creating the best possible youth justice system
    This report reviews the change management process the Center for Behavioral Health and Justice facilitated for the Wayne County Third Circuit Court. The process sought to include strategic facilitation, strong community leadership and a building of collaboration among key partners who hold different perspectives.
    Youth justice
    Report
  • June 2023
    Spatiotemporal Analysis Exploring the Effect of Law Enforcement Drug Market Disruptions on Overdose, Indianapolis, Indiana, 2020 2021
    This study examined how enforcement efforts to disrupt local drug markets by seizing opioids or stimulants were associated with increased spatiotemporal clustering of overdose events in the surrounding geographic area. A retrospective, population-based cohort study using administrative data from Marion County, Indiana was conducted. Within 7, 14, and 21 days, opioid-related law enforcement drug seizures were significantly associated with increased spatiotemporal clustering of overdoses within radii of 100, 250, and 500 meters. To a lesser extent, stimulant-related drug seizures were associated with increased spatiotemporal clustering overdose.
    Harm reduction
    Publication
  • June 2023
    Summer 2023 Newsletter
    School of Social Work Dean and Center for Behavioral Health and Justice Founding Director Sheryl Kubiak is among the activists and artists featured in the Free Your Mind: Art and Incarceration in Michigan exhibition, on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD); Risk-Needs-Responsivity intervention for youth justice; and more.
    Diversion
    Reentry
    Treatment ecosystems
    Youth justice
    Crisis response
    Newsletter
  • June 2023
    Community overdose surveillance: Fentanyl involvement in overdose deaths in rural Michigan
    This publication describe toxicology results from overdose deaths that occurred between January 1, 2018, and December 31, 2020, in 11 rural counties in Michigan, a state with relatively high rates of overdose mortality. The number of observed overdose deaths increased considerably from 2019 to 2020, with an increase of 72.4%. Fentanyl was the most common substance detected and had a 94% increase during the three-year period to present in 70% of all the deaths in these counties in 2020. Among the deaths we examined where cocaine was detected, 69% also contained fentanyl, and in deaths where methamphetamine was detected, 77% also contained fentanyl.
    Other
    Publication
  • April 2023
    The Risk-Needs-Responsivity approach
    The Risk-Needs-Responsivity (RNR) approach is an evidence-based intervention for youth who engage in delinquent behaviors. It is centered on the principle that the risk factors and needs of the youth should determine the appropriate strategies for addressing the factors that underline the delinquent behavior. The RNR approach focuses on rehabilitative interventions that target dynamic factors known to contribute to delinquent behavior. The approach is based on three key principles: risk, need and responsivity.
    Youth justice
    Policy brief
  • April 2023
    Best practices in juvenile justice
    The most effective interventions for youth take into account how brain development impacts youth's behaviors and decision-making impulses. What appears to be increasingly impulsive and delinquent behaviors may instead be developmentally appropriate thinking that will mature over time as the youth goes through adolescence. Research has shown that most youth who exhibit impulsive and sometimes delinquent acts do not carry these behaviors into adulthood. Given the right amount of positive support, even youth who are at high risk of recidivism can be redirected toward a healthy and successful developmental pathway.
    Youth justice
    Policy brief
  • April 2023
    What is a disposition matrix?
    A disposition matrix is a tool used to guide decisions about the best way to hold youth accountable for their unlawful behavior, while also supporting the youth's chance for success. The matrix incorporates data-driven best practices and is designed to ensure that youth receive the most appropriate level of supervision and services based on the seriousness of the offense and their risk of recidivism.
    Youth justice
    Policy brief